Think twice about fooling with the California constitution: Some powerful players want to overhaul the California constitution.

What could go wrong with that?
Sunday, June 14, 2009
Steven Greenhut
Sr. editorial writer and columnist with The Orange County Register
sgreenhut@ocregister.com
Below is an excerpt of this excellent article:
(To read the full article, click here)

“A California constitutional convention would involve about 400 delegates, including people selected at random (like for jury duty) and perhaps including dozens of elected officials. They would propose ideas, hash them out in committees and create a document that revised the state’s enormously long, two-volume constitution. Those changes would then go to the state’s voters for approval or rejection.
It sounds like fun, at least for reporters and civics teachers, but this is a nightmare waiting to happen. Other states have done this. Hawaii, for instance, in 1978 created a new constitution that sensibly required term limits and balanced budgets, but it also created an Office of Hawaiian Affairs that has pushed much of the noxious race-based legislation that has plagued that island state for three decades.
That’s the problem. We would get good and bad, just like we have now. Given the political complexion of this state, it’s hard to imagine that a majority of delegates would yield anything better than we have now, and chances are we would end up with something much worse – such as a new budget process that makes it easier to raise taxes.”